.

  • Written by David Hall, Senior Researcher in Politics, Auckland University of Technology
Jacinda Ardern has spoken about just transitions that implement change but minimise disruption. AAP/ Felipe Trueba, CC BY-ND

When you’re in politics, words are a high-stakes game. Voters and journalists hold you to them and there is a risk in using words that are hard to live up to. This is particularly true for politicians whose reputation is founded on sincerity and authenticity.

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern saddled herself with the word “transformational”. She used it heavily in the heady days of the 2017 election campaign, although less so in the compromised reality of a coalition government. Still, it is the aspiration she is held to. The 2019 well-being budget is held to it by association.

But how do we know transformation when we see it?


À lire aussi : The search for an alternative to GDP to measure a nation's progress – the New Zealand experience


Beyond the status quo

Obviously, transformation must go beyond the status quo. But to be transformative, it must also go beyond mere reform.

A reform agenda recognises that trouble is brewing, that social, economic and environmental trends are on the wrong track. It accepts that major changes to policy and lifestyle may be required. As sustainable development research shows, it does “not locate the root of the problem in the nature of present society, but in imbalances and a lack of knowledge and information”.

It tends to reach for existing policy levers, and to hang its hopes on technical solutions. It reacts to the toughest choices by devising new frameworks for analysing them.

The well-being budget easily goes this far. Finance minister Grant Robertson is entitled to say, as he did in his budget speech, that this is a government “not satisfied with the status quo”.

Most important, New Zealand’s well-being approach de-centres GDP as the principal measure of national success, using instead the multi-dimensional living standards framework. In doing so, Ardern’s government has acted upon doubts that are as old as GDP itself, and gained traction in the years after the 2008 Global Financial Crisis.

As economists Joseph Stiglitz, Amartya Sen and Jean-Paul Fitoussi argued in their influential analysis of what went wrong:

What we measure affects what we do; and if our measurements are flawed, decisions may be distorted.

By arguing for more nuanced national accounting that captures quality of life, they made a case for reform that Ardern’s government is putting into practice.

Beyond reform

A transformative agenda goes further. It sees problems as rooted in the present structure of society. It isn’t only about managing the flaws and oversights of the dominant system, but overturning the system itself. This involves an order of ambition that the well-being budget lacks.

Consider, for instance, its centrepiece investment: NZ$455 million (over four years) for a new frontline service for mental health. This is vital support for those in need, complemented by wider reforms recommended by He Ara Oranga, the report of the inquiry into mental health and addiction.

But its primary focus is to address existing suffering. It doesn’t aim for the socioeconomic or historical causes of many people’s misery and strain. Other aspects of government policy may do, such as the Provincial Growth Fund, by creating meaningful jobs in places where opportunities are low and shame or whakamā are high.

But whether you think this is adequate depends on how you answer the big questions about the structure of the economy, distribution of power and decolonisation. This is undoubtedly the territory of transformational politics, but the well-being budget only touches the edges.

Just transitions

There is another word for change that the prime minister sides with: not “transformation” but just transition. This is the idea that socioeconomic change should be guided by principles of justice, such as equity and inclusivity, to minimise the disruption that change can bring. The aim of a just transition is to achieve revolution without revolt.

The concept is prominent in climate change policy – and the well-being budget delivers projects to support these objectives, including a clean energy development centre in Taranaki, sustainable land-use funding to enable the shift to low-emissions landscapes, and an extended budget line for just transition planning.


À lire aussi : NZ Budget 2019: support for lower-emission business, transport, land use


But Ardern obviously sees the idea of a just transition as more broadly relevant, contrasting it with the “rapid, uncaring change” of structural reforms in 1980s New Zealand. To my mind, this better captures the temper of this government – not transformational, but potentially transitional.

As the well-being approach is bedded in – not only with policy wonks but also business and community leaders, and the voting public – it will loosen GDP’s grip on the minds of decision makers. GDP will be repositioned as only one among many indicators that ought to inform political judgement. Then political leaders can be confidently ambitious, not only with their words, but also their actions.

David Hall ne travaille pas, ne conseille pas, ne possède pas de parts, ne reçoit pas de fonds d'une organisation qui pourrait tirer profit de cet article, et n'a déclaré aucune autre affiliation que son poste universitaire.

Authors: David Hall, Senior Researcher in Politics, Auckland University of Technology

Read more http://theconversation.com/nz-has-dethroned-gdp-as-a-measure-of-success-but-will-arderns-government-be-transformational-118262

2019 Makeup Trends

The year 2019 has brought us a lot of amazing new makeup trends that have made the process of applying makeup much more fun. Still, if we were to follow every single makeup trend out there, we would soon go bankrupt or end up with a look that doe...

Diana Smith - avatar Diana Smith

Spiritual and physical food

In many cultures there are some spiritual rules concerning foods that people are allowed to consume. And just in general, our own bodies can hint using various methods on what we should eat right now ...

News Company - avatar News Company

What to put on the road

When preparing for a road trip at the top of your list should be working out the itinerary. Gather your family together and decide on where you will go, what you will do, and what you will see. It is ...

News Company - avatar News Company

Australia's still building 4 in every 5 new houses to no more than the minimum energy standard

New housing in Australia must meet minimum energy performance requirements. We wondered how many buildings exceeded the minimum standard. What our analysis found is that four in five new houses are be...

Trivess Moore, Lecturer, RMIT University - avatar Trivess Moore, Lecturer, RMIT University

Would you eat meat grown from cells in a laboratory? Here's how it works

There is rationale for thinking about alternatives to meat. ShutterstockFor many of us, eating a meal containing meat is a normal part of daily life. But if we dig deeper, some sobering issues emerge...

Leigh Ackland, Professor in Molecular Biosciences, Deakin University - avatar Leigh Ackland, Professor in Molecular Biosciences, Deakin University

Centre-left politics: dead, in crisis, or in transition?

New Labor leader Anthony Albanese will need to negotiate the centre-left 'crisis' if he hopes to win office. AAP/Bianca de MarchiThe ALP’s defeat at the 2019 federal election was a surprise. Sho...

Rob Manwaring, Senior Lecturer, Politics and Public Policy, Flinders University - avatar Rob Manwaring, Senior Lecturer, Politics and Public Policy, Flinders University

Morrison wants to unleash economy's 'animal spirits' and foreshadows new look at industrial relations

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will lay out economic policies "to get Australians off the economic sidelines and on the field again" on Monday. Dean Lewins/AAPScott Morrison will commit to getting con...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

People who spread deepfakes think their lies reveal a deeper truth

Deepfakes make it harder for us to communicate truths to one another and reach consensus on what is real. ScreenshotThe recent viral “deepfake” video of Mark Zuckerberg declaring, “w...

Mark Andrejevic, Professor, School of Media, Film, and Journalism, Monash University - avatar Mark Andrejevic, Professor, School of Media, Film, and Journalism, Monash University

In Never Look Away we finally have a painter biopic offering insight into the creative process

Tom Schilling as Kurt Barnert – a slightly blurred facsimile of the famous German artist Gerhard Richter – in Never Look Away. Pergamon Film, Wiedemann & Berg Filmproduktion, Beta Cine...

Ted Snell, Professor, Chief Cultural Officer, Cultural Precinct, University of Western Australia - avatar Ted Snell, Professor, Chief Cultural Officer, Cultural Precinct, University of Western Australia

Dan Tehan wants a 'model code' on free speech at universities – what is it and do unis need it?

An independent review found there was no freedom of speech crisis at universities, but it recommended a model code of conduct. from shutterstock.comThe federal education minister, Dan Tehan, has calle...

Katharine Gelber, Professor of Politics and Public Policy, The University of Queensland - avatar Katharine Gelber, Professor of Politics and Public Policy, The University of Queensland

For women's sake, let's screen for depression as part of the new heart health checks

Research suggests depression is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. From shutterstock.comThe latest government statistics, released last week, show that from 2001-2016, the rate of cardiac eve...

Adrienne O'Neil, Principal Research Fellow & Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellow, Deakin University - avatar Adrienne O'Neil, Principal Research Fellow & Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellow, Deakin University

5 Home Decor Essentials for a Well Styled Home

Who doesn’t dream of a well-styled home? Well-styled and well-organised. If you are looking for decorating must-haves for your home, you have come to the right place. Consider this article mini-gu...

News Company - avatar News Company

Why Organic SEO Services Matter

Brands trying to build up their popularity are often curious to know how organic services can help them. Well, if you have heard of organic SEO, you’ll probably know it is a vital part of marketi...

News Company - avatar News Company

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on the winding up of Australian Conservatives - and the government's income tax cuts

Michelle Grattan talks with University of Canberra Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Research and Innovation, Professor Leigh Sullivan, about the week in politics. The discussion includes Cory Bernardi anno...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Psst, Matildas: here's the best way to score at the Women's World Cup

Sam Kerr has found plenty of goal-scoring opportunities for the Matildas at this year's Women's World Cup. Guillaume Horcajuelo/EPASport science can offer some valuable insights to the teams contestin...

Mark Scanlan, Sessional Academic, Edith Cowan University - avatar Mark Scanlan, Sessional Academic, Edith Cowan University

The mighty mulga grows deep and lives long

Mark Marathon via Wikipedia, CC BY-SASign up to the Beating Around the Bush newsletter here, and suggest a plant we should cover at batb@theconversation.edu.au. Among the nearly 1,000 species of Aus...

Gregory Moore, Doctor of Botany, University of Melbourne - avatar Gregory Moore, Doctor of Botany, University of Melbourne

Need to find a good restaurant? Economics serves up some golden rules

Stay away from the tourists traps, economics tells us. Your best bet are those cozy places away from the bustle. www.shutterstock.comWhere to eat? It’s a question you’ve probably pondered ...

Lionel Page, Professor in Economics, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Lionel Page, Professor in Economics, University of Technology Sydney

Why revive a forgotten Australian classic? Oriel Gray's The Torrents remains relevant today

Celia Pacquola as Jenny Milford in The Torrents. A new production of the forgotten Australian play shows its themes are still relevant today Philip GostelowReview: The Torrents, Heath Ledger Theatre (...

Vivienne Glance, Hon Research Fellow in Poetry and Theatre studies, University of Western Australia - avatar Vivienne Glance, Hon Research Fellow in Poetry and Theatre studies, University of Western Australia

Difficult for Labor to win in 2022 using new pendulum, plus Senate and House preference flows

Unless Labor improves markedly with the lower-educated, they risk losing the seat count while winning the popular vote at the next election. AAP/Dan PeledAustralian elections have been won in outer ...

Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne - avatar Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

LifeStyle

How to Revolutionize Your Beauty Experience

Being concerned with beauty and cosmetics used to mean frequent visits to the salon and sitting in...

8 Cool Yet Romantic Things to do in Australia

Australia is a wonderful place for vacationing this summer and you can beat the heat as they have ...

How to Banish Dark Circles without the Need for Cucumber Slices

Dark circles can be downright annoying, especially when you are getting enough sleep. So, what cau...

Innovation and Future Trends in the Beauty Industry

  When medicine, tech, and beauty join forces, there’s no stopping the innovative solutions th...