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It's time to change our drug dog policies to catch dealers, not low-level users at public events

Caitlin Hughes, Senior Research Fellow - Criminologist and Drug Policy Researcher, UNSW - avatar Caitlin Hughes, Senior Research Fellow - Criminologist and Drug Policy Researcher, UNSW

The use of drug dogs leads to riskier drug-taking at festivals. ShutterstockIn the early 2000s New South Wales became the first Australian state to introduce drug detection dogs for policing, with the...

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I Need to Know: 'is it normal to get sore down there after sex?'

Melissa Kang, Associate professor, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Melissa Kang, Associate professor, University of Technology Sydney

Sex should never hurt. www.shutterstock.comI Need to Know is an ongoing series for teens in search of reliable, confidential advice about life’s tricky questions. If you’re a teen, send us...

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The battle against bugs: it's time to end chemical warfare

Lizzy Lowe, Postdoctoral researcher, Macquarie University - avatar Lizzy Lowe, Postdoctoral researcher, Macquarie University

Does it really pay to spray? Dmitry Syshchikov/ShutterstockInsects are important wildlife often overlooked in urban habitats. What we do notice are the cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes in and around o...

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Sailors' journals shed new light on Bennelong, a man misunderstood by history

Brett Goodin, Postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Early American Economy & Society, at the Library Company of Philadelphia.., Australian National University - avatar Brett Goodin, Postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Early American Economy & Society, at the Library Company of Philadelphia.., Australian National University

An undated portrait thought to depict Bennelong, signed "W.W." now in the Dixson Galleries of the State Library of New South Wales. Wikimedia Commons The natives of new Holland are perhaps the quicke...

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The decoy effect: how you are influenced to choose without really knowing it

Gary Mortimer, Associate Professor in Marketing and Consumer Behaviour, Queensland University of Technology - avatar Gary Mortimer, Associate Professor in Marketing and Consumer Behaviour, Queensland University of Technology

The decoy effect is the phenomenon where consumers swap their preference between two options when presented with a third option. ShutterstockPrice is the most delicate element of the marketing mix, an...

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Just like HAL, your voice assistant isn't working for you even if it feels like it is

Nathalie Collins, Academic Director (National Programs), Edith Cowan University - avatar Nathalie Collins, Academic Director (National Programs), Edith Cowan University

Space suits from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey on display at the Stanley Kubrick exhibition in LA. Matthew J. Cotter, United Kingdom, CC BY-NC-SAOf all the fictional virtual assistants we know from p...

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A peace agreement in Afghanistan won't last if there are no women at the table

Susan Hutchinson, PhD Candidate, Australian National University - avatar Susan Hutchinson, PhD Candidate, Australian National University

Over the past weeks, the US government has been in peace negotiations with the Taliban. It has been 17 years since US and allied troops first deployed to Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban and suppo...

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Labor's lead cut to 51-49% in latest Ipsos poll

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

The government has substantially narrowed the two-party gap in the Ipsos poll - it now trails Labor by just 49-51%, compared with 46-54% in December. The poll, reported in the Australian Financial Re...

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Putting babies under general anaesthetic won't affect their development, new research shows

Michael Vagg, Clinical associate professor, Deakin University School of Medicine and Pain Specialist, Deakin University - avatar Michael Vagg, Clinical associate professor, Deakin University School of Medicine and Pain Specialist, Deakin University

A new study found no detectable impact on brain development. From shutterstock.comMaking the decision to operate on a baby or toddler can be complex and confronting for parents. It involves weighing t...

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There's little reason for optimism about Closing the Gap, despite changes to education targets

Melitta Hogarth, Lecturer, University of Southern Queensland - avatar Melitta Hogarth, Lecturer, University of Southern Queensland

Again this year, the Closing the Gap report delivered disappointment. www.shutterstock.comThis week saw the release of the annual Closing the Gap report. Much like the previous decade of reports, we l...

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Pages and prejudice: how queer texts could fight homophobia in Australian schools

Annamarie Jagose, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney - avatar Annamarie Jagose, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney

Books are a good starting place to make schools more inviting places for queer students. www.shutterstock.comRecently, the Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE) — the peak pr...

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  • Written by Rochelle Blanch

The new app that links emotions to daily events - helping users increase self-awareness and improve life path.

Expressing and writing down your deepest thoughts and fears can be a scary idea for some. However according to a recent study1, journaling can improve physical and mental health. Now there is an app which acts as a personal, private journal and gives the user insight into their own behavioural and emotional patterns.

Realifex stands for Real Life Experience and allows users to record their own life experiences as they occur and with each event the user can record the impact of each experience and how it made them feel. The app helps encourage users to better define their own life path through increased self-awareness and make more educated choices based on their own experience and goals. In a world where stories are told, but no longer lived, Realifex aims to give control back to the individual. The app encourages daily introspection and allows users to be more mindful of their own life and direction.

Alex Prate, founder of Realifex, believes this app is exactly what people need to make themselves more aware of their moods and routines.

“It became obvious to me, after discussions with people about their lives, that very few are living the life they’d previously aspired to. The majority of people let life happen to them, instead of directing their intention to create their dream life. I believe only a small minority of people think deeply and regularly about what could positively influence their life and follow their own path,” says Alex.

“For this reason I created Realifex, to help individuals understand their life experiences and emotions with more clarity and hopefully use this information to guide them down the right path for the future. In this day and age everyone is on their phones all the time, this app utilises that habit and turns into a positive by allowing users to become more mindful of their own perception of life. Rather than people hiding behind their phone, they can use their phone to make better life choices to suit their lifestyles,” says Alex.

Realifex contains many features that help users organise their thoughts and emotions. These include:
- Life Flow - users can insert or search for #topics included in their notes
- Life Map – users can see where they feel, whether positively or negatively
- Life Path - sees trends in the users’ emotions over time
- Life Focus - sees which aspects of the users’ life influences them the most and in a positive or negative way
- Life Summary - sees an overview of the users’ life, how they feel and the combined impact of the users experiences.

Realifex captures lifes’ experiences privately. It enriches the users’ thoughts with contextual data and creates meaningful insights about their lives

“When users look back at the notes they have made and they see that the hashtag #work is always associated with a negative emotion, it may be that their job is causing them too much stress or unhappiness. Therefore they need to make a choice whether to leave their current job and find something that is more satisfying for them. The app is simply to make users more aware in order to make positive changes to their life,” says Alex.

Realifex has been designed for both the iPhone and Apple Watch. The Apple Watch allows users to quickly dictate their thoughts into the app. From October, Realifex will be incorporating more features which include the ability to add photos to Life Flow notes as well as contextual data like heart rate, weather, steps, calories and sleep. There will also be the ability to explore life on multiple angles like time, categories, perception, heart rate, activity, weather. This will help the user better understand their emotional and behaviour patterns.

Realifex is currently available from the Apple App store and has a free 10 day trial period. Realifex is available to purchase for $1.25 a month for 12 months.
For more information please visit www.realifex.com

1.  www.scientificamerican.com/article/writing-can-help-injuries-heal-faster/

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